Chicago murals: Dozens of murals painted on boarded-up storefronts after George Floyd assassination are now on display – Chicago Sun-Times | WHs Answers

After George Floyd, a black man, was killed by a white Minneapolis police officer in 2020, protests erupted in Chicago and other cities, and many business owners scrambled to put wooden planks over storefronts to protect them from vandalism.

These boards quickly turned into canvases for street artists, who used them to create murals expressing support for a new civil rights movement, condemning racism and promoting peace and unity.

These boards were eventually removed, but they were not discarded. Dozens of them are now on display on the grounds of the DuSable Black History Museum and Education Center, 740 E. 56th Pl.

The far left mural was made by a South Side artist known from Don Mega. He says the artwork was a “Sesame Street idea.” . . a beautiful way of representing the idea of ​​coming together.” At the time he painted the panels, they covered the windows of a Loop Hotel.

Robert Herguth / Sun Times

Many are located along Cottage Grove Avenue and are visible to passing motorists and pedestrians.

A group of murals promoting love and peace, including one in the upper left by artist Joshua

A group of murals promoting love and peace, including one in the upper left by artist Joshua “SNAGZ” Valdovino and one in the upper right by the artist named Voodoo Masochist, which reads “We Got Dis!”

Robert Herguth / Sun Times

They are part of an exhibition called Resilient Voices that opened last summer and will run until this fall, possibly longer.

Among the murals on the grounds of the DuSable Black History Museum and Education Center is one depicting Spider-Man characters painted by the Woodlawn artist known as

Among the murals on the grounds of the DuSable Black History Museum and Education Center is one depicting Spider-Man characters painted by the Woodlawn artist known as “Reco the Great.” He says the images were about debunking “the uncomfortable conversations” about race in America.

Robert Herguth / Sun Times

The artwork touches on the trauma being felt in the black community – from actions by the police, business, the pandemic or other forces – and also coming together and having hope.

Behind many of the murals was a group calling themselves Paint the City.

“We had a large network of artists that we worked with,” says Missy Perkins, co-founder of the group, which matches artists with companies.

A series of murals at the DuSable Black History Museum and Education Center, which includes a painting on the far left of Ahmaud Arbery, a black man killed by white men while jogging in Georgia in 2020.  The mural by passing artist Nick Apple was originally painted on the front of a Logan Square restaurant.

A series of murals at the DuSable Black History Museum and Education Center, which includes a painting on the far left of Ahmaud Arbery, a black man killed by white men while jogging in Georgia in 2020. The mural by passing artist Nick Apple was originally painted on the front of a Logan Square restaurant.

Robert Herguth / Sun Times

“When we made these boards, we made them everywhere,” says Perkins. “It wasn’t just in one particular area.”

Her group collected the plywood murals as they were removed from storefronts and worked with DuSable Museum officials and other groups to put them back on display.

Other plywood murals at the DuSable Black History Museum and Education Center, part of the Resilient Voices exhibit.

Other plywood murals at the DuSable Black History Museum and Education Center, part of the Resilient Voices exhibit.

Robert Herguth / Sun Times

“We were one of the few organizations that managed to salvage most of our boards, so it was a big undertaking,” says Perkins.

Perri Irmer, DuSable’s President and Chief Executive Officer, said, “It’s very beautiful art, but it’s also very meaningful art. It communicates emotions and feelings and also actions.”

These murals are also on display at the DuSable Black History Museum and Education Center.  The one in the middle is by Barrett Keithley, co-founder of the Paint the City arts initiative, which was influential in creating and preserving street murals amid protests following the 2020 killing of George Floyd by a white Minneapolis police officer.

These murals are also on display at the DuSable Black History Museum and Education Center. The one in the middle is by Barrett Keithley, co-founder of the Paint the City arts initiative, which was influential in creating and preserving street murals amid protests following the 2020 killing of George Floyd by a white Minneapolis police officer.

Robert Herguth / Sun Times

The murals will remain on display at the museum beyond this fall, Irmer says, if means can be found to weather them.

These works, now housed at the DuSable Black History Museum and Education Center, are part of the

These works, now housed at the DuSable Black History Museum and Education Center, are part of the “Resilient Voices” street art exhibit.

Robert Herguth / Sun Times

Dorian Sylvain, one of the project’s curators, says, “We believe it is important not only to preserve these creative objects, but to display them for the community to be proud of, as a legacy of Chicago and Chicago history building movements that will continue into the future.”

These murals are part of the exhibition at the DuSable Black History Museum and Education Center, but weren't displayed on storefronts like most others.  They were designed by inmates as part of an initiative called the Prison + Neighborhood Arts/Education Project.

These murals are part of the exhibition at the DuSable Black History Museum and Education Center, but weren’t displayed on storefronts like most others. They were designed by inmates as part of an initiative called the Prison + Neighborhood Arts/Education Project.

Robert Herguth / Sun Times

Another mural designed by inmates as part of the Prison + Neighborhood Arts/Education Project.

Another mural designed by inmates as part of the Prison + Neighborhood Arts/Education Project.

Robert Herguth / Sun Times

Click on the map below to see a selection of murals in the Chicago area

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